Git & GitHub Foundations • Episode #5 – Forks and Pull Requests

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Subscribe: http://bit.ly/githubguides • Code socially by using the collaborative model of Forking and Pull Requests to offer your changes to any open source …

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Chad Watkins says:

Thank you so much, very helpful

Matthew McCullough says:

Matthew from GitHub Training here. That’s a great suggestion. Could you send that idea with just a few more bullet points over via email to training at github.com and let Jessica know we talked over here on YouTube and we’ll put it in the queue for a screencast.

Matthew McCullough says:

Matthew from GitHub Training here. The primary resource that I personally use to stay fresh on those option switches is the HTML-rendered pages over at git-scm dot com/docs

Each command gets its own page, so for example, the pull option has git-scm dot com/docs/git-pull

Chad Watkins says:

I have been really enjoying your git and github tutorials. Is there some resource that expains all the git options(I hope that is the right term) like -a, -m, -u, -b, etc. I can’t find it anywhere with a google search. Thanks.

David Cramer says:

This is cool! Is there another video that shows them the workflow for adding an upstream remote, updating their fork’s master branch, and then rebasing their working branch onto it? I show new folks this whole workflow often and love the idea of having a couple of videos to point them to.

GitHub Guides says:

Also, be sure to check out Episode #8 for Merging too!

GitHub Guides says:

Sorry to hear this was confusing! The ‘-a’ from the commit command is shorthand for “–all” which gets all modified files and commits them. This is a pretty regular command flag I encourage you to try out too!

Origin is also a remote endpoint that we have by default when we clone. It’s Git’s way of providing us a shorthand for the upstream repository on github.com. As for falsely implying that merges are done on the server, the push command sends data to GitHub so we can open a pull request.

Matthew McCullough says:

That’s my fun GraphLive script that can be found over at github.com / matthewmccullough/scripts/blob/master/git-graphlive

Sahil Garg says:

I ran that script. It gives “fatal: unrecognized argument: -“

Sahil Garg says:

How to get that visualization on the right side of your terminal?

GitHub Guides says:

Well, thank you! Glad you enjoy it.

ujacibljenje says:

This tutorial is hot.

Mateusz Łoskot says:

Hi,

This is awesome, thank you!

GitHub Guides says:

Hey Mateusz,

We just included a “Tools” section in the video description, so check it out there. Thanks for the nice compliment and so glad you like the series!

Mateusz Łoskot says:

Great video and the whole series, thanks!

Is the real-time history visualisation a video capturing trick or you did use a tool dedicated to monitor the tree and update history in separate terminal? If the latter, what is the tool, could you share?

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